The Catalog of New Emotions: S.I.P.

Privelege has its membership

S.I.P. (Rhymes with: Yes, I pee.) noun — an acronym for Self-Important Person

Usage:      
The way he swanned in here, I thought he must be looking for the  S.I.P. lounge.

She was parading around like Yugoslavian royalty; I felt like slapping an S.I.P. badge on her.

Etymology:  The acronym comes from V.I.P.,  Very Important Person, and is used to describe a sense of entitlement and self-aggrandizing that, while as old as human history, has hit hysterical levels with the onset of selfies and social networking. Just remember: If you have to blow your own horn, it is probably a tin one.

The Catalog of New Emotions is a project to refine our emotional sensibilities through the creation of new emotions and the development of a vocabulary to express these new emotions. If you would like to contribute to this project leave a comment the definition of the new emotion, including pronunciation; examples of usage; etymology of the word and why this new emotion is necessary.

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To see all the entries in  The Catalog of New Emotions, click here.

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The Catalog of New Emotions: The awareness of an Austrian lesbian

Daniela-Iraschko-Stolz by Matthias Schrader for AP

The awareness of an Austrian lesbian/ idiom — describes a sense of smugness born of privilege and willful ignorance, variations include “the social consciousness of an Austrian ski-jumper” or simply “Austrian lesbian” or “Austrian ski-jumper.” The phrase is very closely linked to another:  “as dense as a gay American figure skater.”

An idiom with an opposite meaning is: “She’s smart enough to play in the gay NBA.” This expression reflects the comments made by gay ex-NBA John Amaechi: “For me, silence in the face of attendance in Sochi is complicity,” says Amaechi, who played for Orlando Magic and Utah Jazz during his basketball career. “You become nothing more than another Sochi mascot that people can have their photograph taken with as a memento of the abdication of responsibility. I don’t think it’s a predicament. I do understand that there is risk. But principles are usually associated with risk.”

Usage:   I don’t think he’s read a newspaper in a decade; he’s such an Austrian lesbian.

If she were anymore self-involved, she’d be a gay American figure skater.

He’s as spoiled as an Austrian ski-jumper.

Etymology: The idiom arises from the comments made by Daniela Iraschko-Stolz, an out lesbian athlete at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, when she dismissed protests against the abuse of human rights in Russia, thereby displaying truly Olympian levels of ignorance and self-involvement.

Note that Olympic Athletes are providing endless examples of the usefulness of this phrase. Take for example the Canadian athletes who fawned over Putin when he dropped by Canada House. They should not even have let him through the door, let alone have snapped selfies with him: “The Canadian athletes behaved no better than an Austrian ski-jumper as they fell all over themselves to snap selfies with the ruthless dictator, Vladimir Putin.”

The Catalog of New Emotions is a project to refine our emotional sensibilities through the creation of new emotions and the development of a vocabulary to express these new emotions. If you would like to contribute to this project leave a comment the definition of the new emotion, including pronunciation; examples of usage; etymology of the word and why this new emotion is necessary.

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The Catalog of New Emotions: Pardonwank

The Inauguration Mass For Pardonwanker Pope Francis

Pardonwank (pronounced:  /ˈpɑr dnwæŋk/) noun/verb — to forgive someone for a fault or transgression that you ascribed to them in the first place in order to make yourself feel superior and powerful;  the feeling of smug self-righteousness that accompanies such an act

Usage:             Looking around the restaurant at the people eating meat, Marie felt sorrow for the dead animals but pardonwanked her fellow humans, thinking: “They know not what they do.”

The media continually failed to point out that Pope Francis is the biggest pardonwanker in the world.

Etymology:  A combination of the verbs to pardon and to wank, pardonwank emphasizes that emotions are interactions with the world and highlights that forgiveness always implies a position of self-assumed moral superiority, an attempt to have your slice of judgmental cake and eat it too.

The Catalog of New Emotions is a project to refine our emotional sensibilities through the creation of new emotions and the development of a vocabulary to express these new emotions. If you would like to contribute to this project leave a comment. Your definition of the new emotion should include pronunciation; examples of usage; etymology of the word and why this new emotion is necessary.

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For an antidote to the temptation to pardonwank, listen to:

And recall Patti Smith: “Jesus died for somebody’s sins but not mine.”

The Catalog of New Emotions: Dyseuphoria

The Catalog of New Emotions Dysreuphoria

Dyseuphoria (pronounced:  /dɪsyuˈfɔr i ə/) noun — a state of dissatisfaction and anxiety about not having anything concrete to feel dissatisfied or anxious about; being unhappy about having everything necessary for happiness; feeling bound and determined to be miserable.

Usage:             Wandering through the exhibition about depression, Marie became dyseuphoric.

Whenever Jeff felt dyseuphoria coming on, he would read the news so that he could at least feel righteous indignation and anger.

Etymology: A mish-mash of the words euphoria and dysphoria to convey the contradictory states of mind and being brought about by insipid romantic notions such as “you have to suffer to be beautiful/produce something beautiful.” This emotional state is epidemic among “artists” and “creative types,” and those who watch too much daytime tv.

The Catalog of New Emotions is a project to refine our emotional sensibilities through the creation of new emotions and the development of a vocabulary to express these new emotions. If you would like to contribute to this project leave a comment. Your definition of the new emotion should include pronunciation; examples of usage; etymology of the word and why this new emotion is necessary.

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The Catalog of New Emotions: Vortexted

vortexted

Vortexted (pronounced: /ˈvɔrtɛkstɛd/) adjective — feeling overwhelmed by a storm of text messages from needy, demanding, or insane people about a particular person, occurrence, or event, past, future, or purely imaginary.

Usage: I was vortexted by George this morning about last night and me and some guy with a douchetag who I don’t remember and suspect doesn’t even exist.

Etymology: A combination of vortex and text that first appeared as, “He’s vortexting you!” after a friend said that someone just kept sending her more and more texts. Contributed by John Mackenzie.

The Catalog of New Emotions is a project to refine our emotional sensibilities through the creation of new emotions and the development of a vocabulary to express these new emotions. If you would like to contribute to this project leave a comment. Your definition of the new emotion should include pronunciation; examples of usage; etymology of the word and/or why this new emotion is necessary.

To see all the entries in  The Catalog of New Emotions, click here.

The Catalog of New Emotions: Elegayic

Quentin Crisp

Elegayic (pronounced: /ˈɛl ɪ geɪyik/) adjective — possessed of a sad, sombre and dignified air

Usage:             Her every movement, from the way she seated herself to the manner in which she removed and folded her gloves, was elegayic.

Those who dared disturbed his elegayic poise instantly regretted it.

Etymology: A combination of the words elegant, gay and elegiac that came about as a misreading of the word elegiac. This emotional state is embodied by immaculately turned out old women who have buried at least one husband and old-style queens who came of age before gay rights and/or who lived through the worst of the onset of AIDS.  Their dignified demeanors conceal steely temperaments forged by having faced down every type of bully and misfortune life has thrown in their paths.

The Catalog of New Emotions is a project to refine our emotional sensibilities through the creation of new emotions and the development of a vocabulary to express these new emotions. If you would like to contribute to this project leave a comment. Your definition of the new emotion should include pronunciation; examples of usage; etymology of the word and/or why this new emotion is necessary.

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The Catalog of New Emotions: Googlish

googlish

Googlish (pronounced: /ˈgug lɪʃ/) adjective — being curious to a very mild degree, so much so that you may or may not take the time to google the topic that barely aroused your interest.

Usage:            By the time she was in a front of her computer, she was no longer googlish.

After watching Lincoln, he was googlish to know how historically accurate it was.

Etymology: It has never been easier to look up facts. Paradoxically, interest in doing so has never been lower.

The Catalog of New Emotions is a project to refine our emotional sensibilities through the creation of new emotions and the development of a vocabulary to express these new emotions. If you would like to contribute to this project leave a comment. Your definition of the new emotion should include pronunciation; examples of usage; etymology of the word and why this new emotion is necessary.

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In in a related news story, a casebook study on what is wrong with copyright law.

The Catalog of New Emotions: Clitorecstasy

clitorectasy

Clitorecstasy (pronounced: / klɪtərɛkstəsi/) noun — describes the state of delight, surprise, and relief that a woman feels when she realizes that her lover is cliterate, i.e. her lover has the ability to navigate the clitoris based on an understanding that it is fundamental to the female orgasm.

Usage:             She never failed to be surprised by the feeling of clitorecstasy.

Dare she hope that entering Maria’s bed would lead to clitorecstasy?

Etymology: The word originates from a suggestion by Catherine Jones to incorporate the word cliteracy into the catalog.

The Catalog of New Emotions is a project to refine our emotional sensibilities through the creation of new emotions and the development of a vocabulary to express these new emotions. If you would like to contribute to this project leave a comment. Your definition of the new emotion should include pronunciation; examples of usage; etymology of the word and why this new emotion is necessary.

To see all the entries in  The Catalog of New Emotions, click here.

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The Catalog of New Emotions: Disrobia

disrobia

Disrobia (pronounced: /dɪsˈroʊ biə/) noun — the mixture of lust, anticipation, curiosity and dash of trepidation felt while undressing someone you are about to have sex with for the first time.

Usage:             She had not felt such intense disrobia since she was sixteen.

Disrobia is one of the best parts of having sex with someone new.

Etymology:  The excitement, anticipation and building sexual tension all make disrobing someone else before sex a very unique experience, especially when it is the first time. Even the most experienced and expert lovers will often fumble over the belts, snaps, buttons and clasps.

The Catalog of New Emotions is a project to refine our emotional sensibilities through the creation of new emotions and the development of a vocabulary to express these new emotions. If you would like to contribute to this project leave a comment. Your definition of the new emotion should include pronunciation; examples of usage; etymology of the word and why this new emotion is necessary.

To see all the entries in  The Catalog of New Emotions, click here.

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The Catalog of New Emotions: Beastophilia

human male

Beastophilia (pronounced: /ˌbistəˈfɪliə/) noun — an affective disorder in which the attraction to and concern for non-human creatures becomes more powerful than that felt for humans.

Usage:             A sure sign of beastophilia is supporting PETA.

His beastophilia regularly got the better of him and he would spend whole days accompanied only by his dog.

Etymology:  People who have very little exposure to animals in their natural or productive environments, i.e. the wild and farms, are particularly prone to beastophilia, their feelings about animals having been shaped by television, films, cat videos on the Internet, and their interactions with their dependent bio-slaves, i.e. pets.

The Catalog of New Emotions is a project to refine our emotional sensibilities through the creation of new emotions and the development of a vocabulary to express these new emotions. If you would like to contribute to this project leave a comment. Your definition of the new emotion should include pronunciation; examples of usage; etymology of the word and why this new emotion is necessary.

To see all the entries in  The Catalog of New Emotions, click here.